Text Box: Text Box: Available space for Advertisement
Contact:
ads@ubol.com

Multi Cultural Africa

Safe Guarding African Languages:

Conference on ‘Linguistic Diversity in Africa’ at the University of London (Students’) Union                                

Many African scholars are coming to deliver academic papers at the forthcoming Conference ‘Linguistic Diversity in Africa’ that will take place on 4th and 5th March 2006 at the University of London (Students’) Union in Malet Street in London. The two-day event will unite applied linguists, English Language Teaching practitioners, translators and interpreters, writers, poets, educators, and all those who wish to promote, develop and preserve African languages.

The event is sponsored by the British Academy who has funded the keynote and plenary speakers. While the event seems to be for a specialist audience, it may still be useful for anyone who takes interest in languages.  The conference presenters also include academics and professionals based in the UK (Africans and non-Africans).

Conference Aims

The Conference is held in order to achieve several important aims and objectives, for example: to raise awareness of the current situation of the linguistic diversity in Africa, examine the threat to the existence of some African languages and dialects, and find ways of preserving Africa’s rich linguistic heritage. for example: to raise awareness of the current situation of the linguistic diversity in Africa, examine the threat to the existence of some African languages and dialects, and find ways of preserving Africa’s rich linguistic heritage.

During the Conference the participants will be trying to: ‘share the beauty’ of the linguistic diversity in Africa by focusing on certain countries (e.g. Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, Somalia, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Ghana, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Ethiopia); to establish how British and European scholars can contribute to the work to this effect currently conducted by African academics; to identify what human and materials resources are needed to assist African scholars.

Invitation

UK-based Africans who wish to present something at the Conference or who just wish to attend, please contact Mark without delay. Visitors from Africa would need to secure their own funds. In the future, however, given sufficient notice it may be possible to find sponsors / donors for selected African academics who would wish to be presenters at UK events.

The organisers hope that the event breaks new ground, and – given that 2006 is the Year of Languages in Africa – why not do our best to commemorate this!

Presenters

Dr Peter Kibiwott Kurgat (United States International University, Nairobi, Kenya). Title: “Languages and Dialects of Kenya: The Current Status Quo and Prognoses for the Future”.

 

Lem Lilian Atanga (Lancaster University) & Miriam Ayafor (University of Yaoundé, Cameroon). Title: “Intertextuality and Interdiscursivity in the Cameroonian Parliament”.

 

Adam Cholong Ohiri Aham (University of Juba, College of Education, Department of English Language & Literature, Sudan) . Title: “The Linguistic Implication of the Implementation of the Sudan's Comprehensive Peace Agreement”.

 

Ayo Ayodele (Department of English, Lagos State University, Ojo, Nigeria)

Title: “Towards Language Maintenance: The Paradox of Babel's Riches and Language Survival in Nigeria”.

 

Professor Davie Mutasa (Department of African Languages, UNISA, University of South Africa). Title: “Linguistic diversity and its impact on mother tongue education in South Africa”.

 

Organisation Weakness

 

A weakness   of the conference organisation so far is the absence of representatives from the Greater Afrikan Diaspora, from the Caribbean and Americas.  Notification was late getting to them.

 

“The question of African languages is particularly significant and historic to the Africans, who were forcefully transported to the Americas, including the Caribbean, given their practical, painful and protracted experiences, having had their African languages removed from them, during the Western Hemisphere  and Arabic Leaders’ Slave Trade in African people in the past. African Peoples in the Afrikan Diaspora are poorer without their linguistic heritage. In some areas of Africa today, Africans are still being forced fed languages other than their ancestral tongues,” said Dr. Vince Hines  

 

Dr. Hines continued: “The lesson from the Afrikan Diaspora is clear, it is crucial that African in Africa must safeguard against   lost of African languages and ensure that there is no covert or overt commercial or constitutional policies   which separate African and foreign languages as ‘inferior’ and ‘superior’, where the ‘native’ languages are deemed ‘inferior’ and the ‘ ex-colonial’ managers’ deemed superior.”

 

For more information about the Conference, access the website www.mkuked.co.uk or e-mail Mark Krzanowski (Conference Organiser) on markkski1@btinternet.com  

Prospective participants are advised to register NOW / as early as possible since the number of places is limited.

_____________________________________________________

Conference details were circulated, via Email, by The Africa Centre
38 King Street
Covent Garden
London, WC2E 8JT
Tel: 0044 207 836 1973
Fax: 0044 207 836 1975
Email:
info@africacentre.org.uk
Website:
http://www.africacentre.org.uk

 

Posted 23.02.06. 0130 GMT                                Top of page

 

Self-Help News Contents

Opinions & Views

Feedback

Events

Contact Us

Mission Statement

Links

Travel

Africa &

Diaspora

World News Management

Politics & Government

Business

UBOL.COM

Vince Hines Foundation

Disclaimer: Opinions and views expressed on this website are solely those of the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect the views of the owners and/or administrators of this site. Copyright ©1970-2006. All rights reserved. Zulu Publications.

Last up-dated 23rd August 2006.

 

Home

Publications and

Reviews

 Health Issues

HIV/Aids & Creators

Profiles

(Legends in their fields)          

Education and Training

Community Matters

The Environment

Sports

Films,

Music & Entertainment

Youth & the Survival Game in Britain (YSGB)

Short Story &   Writers’ Forum

What is Pan-Africanism

Editorial

Resident and Guest Correspondents

 

______________

1807-2007

 

Britain Commemorates  the Bicentenary

 of  The Slave Trade Abolition  Act 1807.

 

One of the Black Community’s Contributions -

 

“Cries of Our Kidnapped Afrikan Ancestors”

 

 

 

________________

Beliefs and Commentaries

 

“All faith is FALSE, all faith is TRUE.

TRUTH is the shattered mirrors strewn In myriad bits; while each BELIEVES

His LITTLE BIT the whole to own.”

 

From “The Kasidah of Hji Abu el-Yezdi”, as translated by Sir Richard F. Burton

 

Home

Publications and

Reviews

 Health Issues

HIV/Aids & Creators

Profiles

(Legends in their fields)          

Education and Training

Community Matters

The Environment

Sports

Films,

Music & Entertainment

Youth & the Survival Game in Britain (YSGB)

Short Story &   Writers’ Forum

What is Pan-Africanism

Editorial

Resident and Guest Correspondents

 

______________

1807-2007

 

Britain Commemorates  the Bicentenary

 of  The Slave Trade Abolition  Act 1807.

 

One of the Black Community’s Contributions -

 

“Cries of Our Kidnapped  Ancestors”

 

 

 

________________

Beliefs and Commentaries

 

“All faith is FALSE, all faith is TRUE.

TRUTH is the shattered mirrors strewn In myriad bits; while each BELIEVES

His LITTLE BIT the whole to own.”

 

From “The Kasidah of Hji Abu el-Yezdi”, as translated by Sir Richard F. Burton