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Text Box: Marcus Mosiah Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association form a critical link in black America's centuries-long struggle for freedom, justice, and equality. As the leader of the largest organized mass movement in black history and progenitor of the modern "black is beautiful" ideal, Garvey is now best remembered as a champion of the back-to-Africa movement. In his own time he was hailed as a redeemer, a "Black Moses." Though he failed to realize all his objectives, his movement still represents a liberation from the psychological bondage of racial inferiority.

Marcus Mosiah Garvey stands out in history as one who was greatly committed to the concept of the Emancipation of minds.  He sought the unification of all Blacks through the establishment of the United Negro Improvement Association and spoke out against economic exploitation and cultural denigration.

Jamaica’s first national hero was born in Saint Ann’s Bay on August17, 1887.  In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper "The Watchman".

During his career Marcus Garvey travelled extensively throughout many countries observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.

In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects; protest against racial discrimination and cultural activities.

In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country.  He spent many years in the United States pursuing his goal of Black Unification.

However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.

Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity forming the People’s Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections.  The world of the thirties was not ready for Marcus Garvey’s progressive ideas. He  left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940.

His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.

Marcus Garvey’s legacy can be summed up in the philosophy he taught - race pride, the need for African unity; self-reliance; the need for black people to be organised and for ruler to govern on behalf of the working classes.

His political and cultural activities were largely unsuccessful in his own day but he is now revered as one of the fathers of West Indian nationalism and black racial pride.

The Saint Ann Heritage Foundation in Jamaica is soliciting funds to restore the birthplace of Marcus Garvey.

 

Associated links: The Life and Times of The Rt. Excellent Marcus Mosiah Garvey

 

 

 

 

 

Rt. Excellent

Marcus Mosiah Garvey

1887-1940

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Last up-dated 22nd August 2006

 

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1807-2007

 

Britain Commemorates  the Bicentenary

 of  The Slave Trade Abolition  Act 1807.

 

One of the Black Community’s Contributions -

 

“Cries of Our Kidnapped Ancestors”

 

 

 

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“All faith is FALSE, all faith is TRUE.

TRUTH is the shattered mirrors strewn In myriad bits; while each BELIEVES

His LITTLE BIT the whole to own.”

 

From “The Kasidah of Hji Abu el-Yezdi”, as translated by Sir Richard F. Burton